Long John Silver Trust




Each day we offer you at least one different Fact of the Day, which is usually Pirate orientated:
Fact of the Day:-

The original scimitar was called a "shamshir", meaning "lions tail", and had a deeply curved blade that was almost a half circle. Originally developed in Persia, this type of blade saw immense popularity in many Muslim and Indian regions across Europe and Eurasia. The oversized design of the blade caused the weapon to be fairly heavy - much more so that the equivalent European short sword. This weight added impressive power to a strike made with the weapon, but that same weight made the blades more difficult to control, and awkward in the close quarters of combat at sea. Due to these problems, the design of the Scimitar saw many changes as it's dimensions were modified over the centuries to better match it's owner's intended application, but the signature curve has always remained a mainstay of the weapon.


Fact of the Day:-

Buccaneers were pirates who, during the 16th and 17th centuries, preyed mainly on Spanish commerce with the Spanish American colonies. Piracy decreased with the development of the steam engine and the growth of the British and American navies in the late 18th century and early 19th.

At first the headquarters of the buccaneers was on the island of Tortuga, off the northwestern coast of Hispaniola (now Haiti). The buccaneers later used Jamaica as a base of operations. They captured Panama in 1671.


Fact of the Day:-

Buccaneering was a low-budget way to wage war on England's rival, Spain. Thus, the English crown licensed buccaneers with letters of marque, legalising their operations in return for a share of their profits.


Fact of the Day:-

A caravel is a small, highly manoeuvrable sailing ship developed in the 15th century by the Portuguese to explore along the West African coast and into the Atlantic Ocean. The lateen sails gave her speed and the capacity for sailing to windward (beating). Caravels were much used by the Portuguese and Spanish for the oceanic exploration voyages during the 16th and 17th centuries in the age of discovery.



On This Date In History
16th February in 1804:- Lieutenant Stephen Decatur and a handful of volunteers sailed into Tripoli harbour and blew up the captured USS Philadelphia which had fallen into the hands of pirates. The fate of the Philadelphia came about as she cruised off Tripoli until 31st October 1803, when she ran aground on an uncharted reef off Tripoli harbour. All efforts to refloat her under fire from shore batteries and Tripolitan gunboats failed, and she surrendered to the enemy; her officers and men were made slaves of the Pasha. The Philadelphia was too great a prize to be allowed to fall into the hands of the Tripolitans, so a decision was made to recapture or destroy her. An assaulting party, a volunteer group of officers and men under Lieutenant Stephen Decatur, Jr., boarded the ship from the ketch Intrepid, under the guise of a ship in distress in need of a place to tie up after having lost all anchors in a storm. On 16th February 1804 the ship was recaptured and burned where she lay in Tripoli Harbour. Horatio Nelson, himself known as a man of action and bravery, is said to have called this "the most bold and daring act of the age."