Long John Silver Trust




Each day we offer you at least one different Fact of the Day, which is usually Pirate orientated:
Fact of the Day:-

In 1692 Ralph Stout was arrested in India while serving on a Pirate crew under command of James Kelley. The two men served four years in an Indian prison before they were finally able to escape by boat and make their way to Bombay. From there, they enlisted themselves as crew members under the command of Captain Edgecumbe aboard the Mocha, but only eight days after leaving port, Stout and other members of the crew mutinied and seized control of the Mocha. Twenty-seven of the Mocha's loyal crew escaped and reached shore safely, but Captain Edgecumbe wasn't as fortunate. The pirates bludgeoned him to death and threw his body overboard before sailing off with the ship and it's cargo. Following the resounding success of the mutiny, the men elected Ralph Stout as their new Pirate Captain.


Fact of the Day:-

Joseph Rivers was serving with pirate Samuel Bellamy aboard the "Whydah" and went down with the ship in 1717. His career as a pirate spanned two decades, and not even his arrest in 1701 slowed him down. Joining Samuel Bellamy about 1715, he was probably one of the most seasoned men aboard the Whydah.


Fact of the Day:-

James Gilliam, also known as James Kelly, was an English pirate active in the Indian Ocean during the 1690s and was a long-time associate of Captain William Kidd. One of Kidd's earliest crew members, Gilliam was a participant in the mutiny onboard the Mocha and the subsequent murder of Captain Edgecomb who was killed in his sleep.

After taking command of the East Indiaman, Gilliam and the crew of the Mocha captured several ships in the eastern seas until his arrest after returning to New England with Kidd in 1699. Transported to Great Britain, he was tried at the Old Bailey and found guilty of piracy. Whilst in prison, he wrote "A full and true Discovery of all the Robberies, Pyracies, and other Notorious Actions, of that Famous English Pyrate, Capt. James Kelly" which included references to the as yet undiscovered Galapagos Islands before his eventual execution on 12th July 1701.